Developer Forums | About Us | Site Map
Search  
HOME > TUTORIALS > SERVER SIDE CODING > ADMINISTRATION TUTORIALS > PUTTING LINUX RELIABILITY TO THE TEST


Sponsors





Useful Lists

Web Host
site hosted by netplex

Online Manuals

Putting Linux reliability to the test
By Li Ge & Linda Scott & Mark VanderWiele - 2004-01-19 Page:  1 2 3 4 5 6

Linux reliability measurement

Test results at a glance
The following summary is based on the results of the tests and observations on the duration of the runs:

  • The Linux kernel and other core OS components -- including libraries, device drivers, file systems, networking, IPC, and memory management -- operated consistently and completed all the expected durations of runs with zero critical system failures.
  • Every run generated a high success rate (over 95%), with a very small number of expected intermittent failures that were the result of the concurrent executions of tests that are designed to overload resources.
  • Linux system performance was not degraded during the long duration of the run.
  • The Linux kernel properly scaled to use hardware resources (CPU, memory, disk) on SMP systems.
  • The Linux system handled continuous full CPU load (over 99%) and high memory stress well.
  • The Linux system handled overloaded circumstances correctly.

The tests demonstrate that the Linux kernel and other core OS components are reliable and stable over 30, 60, and 90 days, and can provide a robust, enterprise-level environment for customers over long periods of time.

Objectives

The objective of the Linux reliability effort at the IBM Linux Technology Center is to measure the Linux operating system's stability and reliability over long periods of time with an emphasis on workloads relevant to Linux customer environments using the LTP test suite (see Resources for more on the LTP). Identification of defects was not the primary focus.

Test environment overview

This article describes the test results and analysis of 30- and 60-day Linux reliability measure tests using the LTP test suite. The tests used SuSE Linux Enterprise Server v8 (SLES 8) as the testing kernel and IBM pSeries servers as testing hardware. A specially designed stress-test scenario of LTP was used to exercise a wide range of kernel components in parallel with networking and memory management, and to create a high stress workload on the testing system. The Linux kernel, TCP, NFS, and I/O test components were targeted with a heavy-stress workload.

The tests

At 30 days

30-day LTP stress execution results for pSeries

  • Machine: p650 LPAR
  • CPU: (2) Power4- 1.2 GHz
  • Kernel: Linux 2.4.19-ull-ppc64-SMP (SLES 8 SP 1)
  • LTP version: 20030514
  • 99.00 percent Average CPU utilization (User: 48.65 percent, System: 50.35 percent)
  • 80.09 percent Average memory utilization (8GB)

Observations:

  • SLES 8 PPC64 30-day stress run successfully completed on p650 LPAR
  • LTPstress was the test tool. Test cases were executed both in parallel and in sequence
  • Kernel, TCP, NFS, and I/O test components were targeted with heavy stress workloads
  • Success rate: 97.88 percent
  • Zero critical system failures

Figure 1. 30-day LTP stress execution results
30-day LTP stress execution results for the pSeries

At 60 days
60-day LTP stress execution results: pSeries

  • Machine: B80
  • CPU: (2) Power3- 375 MHz
  • Kernel: Linux 2.4.19-ull-ppc64-SMP (SLES 8 SP 1)
  • LTP version: 20030514
  • 99.96 percent average CPU utilization (User: 75.02 percent, System: 24.94 percent)
  • 61.69 percent average memory utilization (8GB)
  • 3.86 percent average swap utilization (1GB)

Observations:

  • SLES 8 PPC64 60-day stress run successfully completed on pSeries B80
  • LTPstress was the test tool. Test cases were executed both in parallel and in sequence
  • Kernel, TCP, NFS, and I/O tests components were targeted with heavy stress workloads
  • Success rate: 95.12 percent
  • Zero critical system failures

Figure 2. 60-day LTP stress execution results
60-day LTP stress execution results for the pSeries



View Putting Linux reliability to the test Discussion

Page:  1 2 3 4 5 6 Next Page: Test infrastructure

First published by IBM developerWorks


Copyright 2004-2017 GrindingGears.com. All rights reserved.
Article copyright and all rights retained by the author.